“When shall we three meet again in thunder, lightning, or in rain? When the hurlyburly ‘s done, When the battle ‘s lost and won”

First Witch When shall we three meet again? In thunder, lightning, or in rain? Second Witch When the hurlyburly's done, When the battle's lost and won. Third Witch That will be ere the set of sun. First Witch Where the place? Second Witch Upon the heath. Third Witch There to meet with Macbeth. First Witch I come, Graymalkin! Second Witch Paddock calls. Third Witch Anon. ALL Fair is foul, and foul is fair: Hover through the fog and filthy air. This quote is from Act I Read more [...]

“All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand”

This quote is from Act V Scene 1 of William Shakespeare’s play, Macbeth. I this scene a gentlewoman and the doctor are talking about Lady Macbeth. Suddenly she enters with a candle in her hand. She talks about the murder of Lady MacDuff and Banquo. In this trace she feels having blood on her hands which cannot be washed. Read more [...]

William Shakespeare: Dirge

Come away, come away, death, And in sad cypres let me be laid; Fly away, fly away, breath; I am slain by a fair cruel maid. My shroud of white, stuck all with yew, O prepare it! My part of death, no one so true Did share it. Not a flower, not a flower sweet, On my black coffin let there be strown; Not a friend, not a friend greet My poor corse, where my bones shall be thrown: A thousand thousand sighs to save, Lay me, O, where Sad true lover never find my grave To weep there! The Read more [...]

William Shakespeare: Carpe Diem

O mistress mine, where are you roaming? O stay and hear! your true-love's coming That can sing both high and low; Trip no further, pretty sweeting, Journey's end in lovers' meeting-- Every wise man's son doth know. What is love? 'tis not hereafter; Present mirth hath present laughter; What's to come is still unsure: In delay there lies no plenty,-- Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty, Youth's a stuff will not endure. This poem is from As You Like It. The meaning of the title is: Read more [...]

William Shakespeare: Bridal Song

Roses, their sharp spines being gone, Not royal in their smells alone, But in their hue; Maiden pinks, of odour faint, Daisies smell-less, yet most quaint,  And sweet thyme true; Primrose, firstborn child of Ver; Merry springtime's harbinger, With her bells dim; Oxlips in their cradles growing,  Marigolds on death-beds blowing, Larks'-heels trim; All dear Nature's children sweet  Lie 'fore bride and bridegroom's feet, Blessing their sense!  Not an angel of the air, Bird Read more [...]

William Shakespeare: Blow, Blow Thou Winter Wind

Blow, blow, thou winter wind Thou art not so unkind As man's ingratitude; Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy breath be rude. Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly: Most freindship if feigning, most loving mere folly: Then heigh-ho, the holly! This life is most jolly. Freeze, freeze thou bitter sky, That does not bite so nigh As benefits forgot: Though thou the waters warp, Thy sting is not so sharp As a friend remembered not. Heigh-ho! sing, Read more [...]
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