“After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well”

LADY MACBETH How now, my lord! why do you keep alone, Of sorriest fancies your companions making, Using those thoughts which should indeed have died With them they think on? Things without all remedy Should be without regard: what's done is done. MACBETH  We have scotch'd the snake, not kill'd it: She'll close and be herself, whilst our poor malice Remains in danger of her former tooth. But let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear and Read more [...]

“Tis destiny unshunnable, like death”

OTHELLO Haply for I am black, And have not those soft parts of conversation That chamberers have; or for I am declined Into the vale of years—yet that’s not much— She’s gone. I am abused, and my relief Must be to loathe her. O curse of marriage, That we can call these delicate creatures ours And not their appetites! I had rather be a toad And live upon the vapor of a dungeon Than keep a corner in the thing I love For others’ uses. Yet ’tis the plague of great ones; Prerogatived Read more [...]

“I do perceive here a divided duty.”

DESDEMONA: My noble father, I do perceive here a divided duty. To you I am bound for life and education. My life and education both do learn me How to respect you. You are the lord of my duty, I am hitherto your daughter. But here’s my husband, And so much duty as my mother showed To you, preferring you before her father, So much I challenge that I may profess Due to the Moor my lord.   This quote is from the first act of Shakespeare’s play, Othello. Othello, the Moor is Read more [...]

“Were I the Moor I would not be Iago.”

IAGO: Were I the Moor I would not be Iago. In following him I follow but myself; Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty, But seeming so for my peculiar end. For when my outward action doth demonstrate The native act and figure of my heart In compliment extern, ’tis not long after But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve For daws to peck at. I am not what I am.   This lines are from the first act of Shakespeare’s famous play, Othello. In this speech Iago tells his plan to Read more [...]

“Of one that loved not wisely but too well”

OTHELLO: I pray you, in your letters,  When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice. Then must you speak Of one that lov'd not wisely but too well; Of one not easily jealous, but being wrought, Perplex'd in the extreme…   This line is from the swan-song of Shakespeare famous character, Othello. Othello kills himself, as he has gone mad: one of the men he trusted, Iago cheated on him by pretending he is his friend. Read more [...]

“a foregone conclusion.”

Othello: O monstrous, monstrous! Iago: Nay, this was but his dream. Othello: But this denoted a foregone conclusion. Iago: 'Tis a shrewd doubt, though it be but a dream, And this may help to thicken other proofs, That do demonstrate thinly.   These lines are from Act III Scene 3 from Shakespeare’s play Othello. In this part Othello is already under Iago’s spell and believes that Desdemona has betrayed him. He also believes that Cassio’s alleged dreams are due to adultery Read more [...]
Page 1 of 41234


rebloggy.com